Interference with heparin binding and oligomerization creates a novel anti-inflammatory strategy targeting the chemokine system.

Johnson, Z., Kosco-Vilbois, M.H., Herren, S., Cirillo, R., Muzio, V., Zaratin, P., Carbonatto, M., Mack, M., Smailbegovic, A., Rose, M., Lever, R., Page, C.P., Wells, T.N.C. and Proudfoot, A.E I. (2004) Interference with heparin binding and oligomerization creates a novel anti-inflammatory strategy targeting the chemokine system. Journal of Immunology, 173 (9). pp. 5776-5785.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

A hallmark of autoimmunity and other chronic diseases is the overexpression of chemokines resulting in a detrimental local accumulation of proinflammatory immune cells. Chemokines play a pivotal role in cellular recruitment through interactions with both cell surface receptors and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Anti-inflammatory strategies aimed at neutralizing the chemokine system have to-date targeted inhibition of the receptor-ligand interaction with receptor antagonists. In this study, we describe a novel strategy to modulate the inflammatory process in vivo through mutation of the essential heparin-binding site of a proinflammatory chemokine, which abrogates the ability of the protein to form higher-order oligomers, but retains receptor activation. Using well-established protocols to induce inflammatory cell recruitment into the peritoneal cavity, bronchoalveolar air spaces, and CNS in mice, this non-GAG binding variant of RANTES/CCL5 designated [44AANA47]-RANTES demonstrated potent inhibitory capacity. Through a combination of techniques in vitro and in vivo, [44AANA47]-RANTES appears to act as a dominant-negative inhibitor for endogenous RANTES, thereby impairing cellular recruitment, not through a mechanism of desensitization. [44AANA47]-RANTES is unable to form higher-order oligomers (necessary for the biological activity of RANTES in vivo) and importantly forms nonfunctional heterodimers with the parent chemokine, RANTES. Therefore, although retaining receptor-binding capacity, altering the GAG-associated interactive site of a proinflammatory chemokine renders it a dominant-negative inhibitor, suggesting a powerful novel approach to generate disease-modifying anti-inflammatory reagents.

Item Type:Article
Departments, units and centres:Department of Pharmacology > Department of Pharmacology
ID Code:3188
Journal or Publication Title:Journal of Immunology
Deposited By:Library Staff
Deposited On:10 May 2012 14:36
Last Modified:10 May 2012 14:36

Repository Staff Only: Item control page

School of Pharmacy Staff Only: Edit a copy to replace this item