The Use of Inverse Phase Gas Chromatography to Measure the Surface Energy of Crystalline, Amorphous, and Recently Milled Lactose

Newell, H.E., Buckton, G., Butler, D.A., Thielmann, F. and Williams, D.R. (2001) The Use of Inverse Phase Gas Chromatography to Measure the Surface Energy of Crystalline, Amorphous, and Recently Milled Lactose. Pharmaceutical Research, 18 (5). pp. 662-666. 10.1023/A:1011089511959.

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DOI: 10.1023/A:1011089511959

Abstract

Abstract Purpose. To assess differences in surface energy due to processing induced disorder and to understand whether the disorder dominated the surfaces of particles. Methods. Inverse gas chromatography was used to compare the surface energies of crystalline, amorphous, and ball milled lactose. Results. The milling process made ca 1% of the lactose amorphous, however the dispersive contribution to surface energy was 31.2, 37.1, and 41.6 mJ m–2 for crystalline, spray dried and milled lactose, respectively. A physical mixture of crystalline (99%) and amorphous (1%) material had a dispersive surface energy of 31.5 mJ m–2. Conclusion. Milling had made the surface energy similar to that of the amorphous material in a manner that was very different to a physical mixture of the same amorphous content. The milled material will have similar interfacial interactions to the 100% amorphous material. inverse gas chromatography - lactose - amorphous - milling - processing induced disorder - dispersive surface energy

Item Type:Article
Departments, units and centres:Department of Pharmaceutics > Department of Pharmaceutics
ID Code:3236
Journal or Publication Title:Pharmaceutical Research
Deposited By:Library Staff
Deposited On:17 May 2012 16:19
Last Modified:17 May 2012 16:19

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